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22 Pennsylvania Code, Chapter 4

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening and Academic Standards for Mathematics

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

Pennsylvania Department of Education

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

 I. TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction…………………………………………………… .

II.

 

THE ACADEMIC STANDARDS

 

 

Learning to Read Independently…………………………… ... Purposes for Reading Word Recognition Skills Vocabulary Development Comprehension and Interpretation Fluency

1.1.

 

Reading Critically in All Content Areas…………………… ... Detail Inferences Fact from Opinion Comparison Analysis and Evaluation

1.2.

 

Reading, Analyzing and Interpreting Literature…………… . Literary Elements Literary Devices Poetry Drama

1.3.

 

Types of Writing……………………………………………… .. Narrative Informational Persuasive

1.4.

 

 

Quality of Writing…………………………………………… ...

1.5.

Focus Content Organization Style Conventions

Speaking and Listening……………………………………… ... 1.6. Listening Skills Speaking Skills Discussion Presentation

Characteristics and Function of the English Language…… ... 1.7. Word Origins Variations Application

Research………………………………………………………...1.8. Selection Location of Information Organization

Glossary………………………………………………………… III.

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

II. INTRODUCTION

This document includes Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening Standards:

� 1.1. Learning to Read Independently � 1.5. Quality of Writing � 1.2. Reading Critically in All Content Areas � 1.6. Speaking and Listening � 1.3. Reading, Analyzing and Interpreting Literature � 1.7. Characteristics and Function of the English Language � 1.4. Types of Writing � 1.8. Research

The Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening Standards describe what students should know and be able to do with the English language at four grade levels (third, fifth, eighth and eleventh). The standards provide the targets for instruction and student learning essential for success in all academic areas, not just language arts classrooms. Although the standards are not a curriculum or a prescribed series of activities, school entities will use them to develop a local school curriculum that will meet local students’ needs.

The language arts— Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening— are unique because they are processes that students use to learn and make sense of their world. Students do not read “reading”; they read about history, science, mathematics and other content areas as well as about topics for their interest and entertainment. Similarly, students do not write “writing”; they use written words to express their knowledge and ideas and to inform or entertain others.

Because of the unique nature of the language arts, all teachers in a school will use the Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening Standards. The standards define the skills and strategies employed by effective readers and writers; therefore, all teachers will assist their students in learning them through multiple classroom situations in all the subject areas.

The Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening Standards also provide parents and community members with information about what students should know and be able to do as they progress through the educational program and at graduation. With a clearly defined target provided by the standards, parents, students, educators and community members become partners in learning success.

A glossary is included to assist the reader in understanding terminology contained in the standards.

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.1. Learning to Read Independently

1.1.3. GRADE 3

1.1.5. GRADE 5

1.1.8. GRADE 8

1.1.11. GRADE 11

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

A. Identify the purposes and types of text (e.g., literature, information) before reading. B. Preview the text formats (e.g., title, headings, chapters and table of contents). C. Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g., root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and context clues to decode and understand new words during reading. D. Read text using self-monitoring comprehension strategies (e.g., predict, revise predictions, reread, use text organization including headings, graphics, and charts, and adjust reading rate). E. Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of words). Use a dictionary when appropriate.

A. Establish the purpose for reading a type of text (literature, information) before reading. B. Select texts for a particular purpose using the format of the text as a guide. C. Use knowledge of phonics, syllabication, prefixes, suffixes, the dictionary or context clues to decode and understand new words during reading. Use these words accurately in writing and speaking. D. Identify the basic ideas and facts in text using strategies (e.g., prior knowledge, illustrations and headings) and information from other sources to make predictions about text. E. Acquire a reading vocabulary by correctly identifying and using words (e.g., synonyms, homophones, homographs, words with roots, suffixes, prefixes).  Use a dictionary or related reference.

A. Locate appropriate texts (literature, information, documents) for an assigned purpose before reading. B. Identify and use common organizational structures and graphic features to comprehend information. C. Use knowledge of root words as well as context clues and glossaries to understand specialized vocabulary in the content areas during reading. Use these words accurately in speaking and writing. D. Identify basic facts and ideas in text using specific strategies (e.g., recall genre characteristics, set a purpose for reading, generate essential questions as aids to comprehension and clarify understanding through rereading and discussion). E. Expand a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using idioms and words with literal and figurative meanings. Use a dictionary or related reference.

A. Locate various texts, media and traditional resources for assigned and independent projects before reading. B. Analyze the structure of informational materials explaining how authors used these to achieve their purposes. C. Use knowledge of root words and words from literary works to recognize and understand the meaning of new words during reading. Use these words accurately in speaking and writing. D. Identify, describe, evaluate and synthesize the essential ideas in text. Assess those reading strategies that were most effective in learning from a variety of texts. E. Establish a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using new words acquired through the study of their relationships to other words. Use a dictionary or related reference.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

F. Understand the meaning of and use correctly new vocabulary learned in various subject areas.

F. Identify, understand the meaning of and use correctly key vocabulary from various subject areas.

F. Understand the meaning of and apply key vocabulary across the various subject areas.

F. Understand the meaning of and apply key vocabulary across the various subject areas.

G. Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and nonfiction text. • Retell or summarize the major ideas, themes or procedures of the text. • Connect the new information or ideas in the text to known information. • Clarify ideas and understandings through rereading and discussion. • Make responsible assertions about the text by citing evidence from the text.

G. Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and nonfiction text. • Summarize the major ideas, themes or procedures of the text. • Relate new information or ideas from the text to that learned through additional reading and media (e.g., film, audiotape). • Clarify ideas and understandings through rereading and discussion. • Make responsible assertions about the ideas from the text by citing evidence. • Extend ideas found in the text.

G. Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and nonfiction text, including public documents. • Make, and support with evidence, assertions about texts. • Compare and contrast texts using themes, settings, characters and ideas. • Make extensions to related ideas, topics or information. • Describe the context of a document. • Analyze the positions, arguments and evidence in public documents.

G. Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and nonfiction text, including public documents. • Make, and support with evidence, assertions about texts. • Compare and contrast texts using themes, settings, characters and ideas. • Make extensions to related ideas, topics or information. • Assess the validity of the document based on context. • Analyze the positions, arguments and evidence in public documents. • Evaluate the author’s strategies. • Critique public documents to identify strategies common in public discourse.

H. Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading. • Read familiar materials aloud with accuracy. • Self-correct mistakes. • Use appropriate rhythm, flow, meter and pronunciation. • Read a variety of genres and types of text. • Demonstrate comprehension (Standard 1.1.3.G.). (Recommend: 25 books/year)

H. Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading. • Read familiar materials aloud with accuracy. • Self-correct mistakes. • Use appropriate rhythm, flow, meter and pronunciation. • Read a variety of genres and types of text. • Demonstrate comprehension (Standard 1.1.5.G.). (Recommend: 25 books/year)

H. Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading. • Read familiar materials aloud with accuracy. • Self-correct mistakes. • Use appropriate rhythm, flow, meter and pronunciation. • Read a variety of genres and types of text. • Demonstrate comprehension (Standard 1.1.8.G.). (Recommend: 25 books/year)

H. Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading. • Read familiar materials aloud with accuracy. • Self-correct mistakes. • Use appropriate rhythm, flow, meter and pronunciation. • Read a variety of genres and types of text. • Demonstrate comprehension (Standard 1.1.11.G.). (Recommend: 25 books/year)

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.2. Reading Critically in All Content Areas

1.2.3. GRADE 3

1.2.5. GRADE 5

1.2.8. GRADE 8

1.2.11. GRADE 11

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

A. Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas. • Differentiate fact from opinion within text. • Distinguish between essential and nonessential information within a text. • Make inferences from text when studying a topic (e.g., science, social studies) and draw conclusions based on text. • Analyze text organization and content to derive meaning from text using established criteria.

A. Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas. • Differentiate fact from opinion across texts. • Distinguish between essential and nonessential information across a variety of texts, identifying stereotypes and exaggeration where present. • Make inferences about similar concepts in multiple texts and draw conclusions. • Evaluate text organization and content to determine the author’s purpose and effectiveness.

A. Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas. • Differentiate fact from opinion utilizing resources that go beyond traditional text (e.g., newspapers, magazines and periodicals) to electronic media. • Distinguish between essential and nonessential information across texts and going beyond texts to a variety of media; identify bias and propaganda where present. • Draw inferences based on a variety of information sources. • Evaluate text organization and content to determine the author’s purpose and effectiveness according to the author’s theses, accuracy and thoroughness.

A. Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas. • Differentiate fact from opinion across a variety of texts by using complete and accurate information, coherent arguments and points of view. • Distinguish between essential and nonessential information across a variety of sources, identifying the use of proper references or authorities and propaganda techniques where present. • Use teacher and student established criteria for making decisions and drawing conclusions. • Evaluate text organization and content to determine the author’s purpose and effectiveness according to the author’s theses, accuracy, thoroughness, logic and reasoning.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

B. Use and understand a variety of media and evaluate the quality of material produced. • Use electronic media for research. • Identify techniques used in television and use the knowledge to distinguish between facts and misleading information. • Assess the quality of media project (e.g., script, play, audiotape) that has been developed for a targeted audience.

B. Use and understand a variety of media and evaluate the quality of material produced. • Use a variety of media (e.g., computerized card catalogues, encyclopedias) for research. • Evaluate the role of media as a source of both entertainment and information. • Use established criteria to design and develop a media project (e.g., script, play, audiotape) for a targeted audience.

B. Use and understand a variety of media and evaluate the quality of material produced. • Compare and analyze how different media offer a unique perspective on the information presented. • Analyze the techniques of particular media messages and their effect on a targeted audience. • Use, design and develop a media project that expands understanding (e.g., authors and works from a particular historical period).

B. Use and understand a variety of media and evaluate the quality of material produced. • Select appropriate electronic media for research and evaluate the quality of the information received. • Explain how the techniques used in electronic media modify traditional forms of discourse for different purposes. • Use, design and develop a media project to demonstrate understanding (e.g., a major writer or literary period or movement).

C. Produce work in at least one literary genre that follows the conventions of the genre.

C. Produce work in at least one literary genre that follows the conventions of the genre.

C. Produce work in at least one literary genre that follows the conventions of the genre.

C. Produce work in at least one literary genre that follows the conventions of the genre.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.3. Reading, Analyzing and Interpreting Literature

 

1.3.3. GRADE 3

1.3.5. GRADE 5

1.3.8. GRADE 8

1.3.11. GRADE 11

 

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

 

A. Read and understand works of literature. B. Identify literary elements in stories describing characters, setting and plot. C. Identify literary devices in stories (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, personification). D. Identify the structures in poetry (e.g., pattern books, predictable books, nursery rhymes).

A. Read and understand works of literature. B. Compare the use of literary elements within and among texts including characters, setting, plot, theme and point of view. C. Describe how the author uses literary devices to convey meaning. • Sound techniques (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, meter, alliteration). • Figurative language (e.g., personification, simile, metaphor, hyperbole). D. Identify and respond to the effects of sound and structure in poetry (e.g., alliteration, rhyme, verse form).

A. Read and understand works of literature. B. Analyze the use of literary elements by an author including characterization, setting, plot, theme, point of view, tone and style. C. Analyze the effect of various literary devices. • Sound techniques (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, meter, alliteration). • Figurative language (e.g., personification, simile, metaphor, hyperbole, allusion). D. Identify poetic forms (e.g., ballad, sonnet, couplet).

A. Read and understand works of literature. B. Analyze the relationships, uses and effectiveness of literary elements used by one or more authors in similar genres including characterization, setting, plot, theme, point of view, tone and style. C. Analyze the effectiveness, in terms of literary quality, of the author’s use of literary devices. • Sound techniques (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, meter, alliteration). • Figurative language (e.g., personification, simile, metaphor, hyperbole, irony, satire). • Literary structures (e.g., foreshadowing, flashbacks, progressive and digressive time). D. Analyze and evaluate in poetry the appropriateness of diction and figurative language (e.g., irony, understatement, overstatement, paradox).

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

E. Identify the structures in drama (e.g., dialogue, story enactment, acts, scenes).

E. Analyze drama as information source, entertainment, persuasion or transmitter of culture.

E. Analyze drama to determine the reasons for a character’s actions taking into account the situation and basic motivation of the character.

E. Analyze how a scriptwriter’s use of words creates tone and mood, and how choice of words advances the theme or purpose of the work.

 

F. Read and respond to nonfiction and fiction including poetry and drama.

F. Read and respond to nonfiction and fiction including poetry and drama.

F. Read and respond to nonfiction and fiction including poetry and drama.

F. Read and respond to nonfiction and fiction including poetry and drama.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.4. Types of Writing

 

1.4.3. GRADE 3

1.4.5. GRADE 5

1.4.8. GRADE 8

1.4.11. GRADE 11

 

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

 

A. Write narrative pieces (e.g., stories, poems, plays). • Include detailed descriptions of people, places and things. • Use relevant illustrations. • Include literary elements (Standard 1.3.3.B.).

A. Write poems, plays and multi-paragraph stories. • Include detailed descriptions of people, places and things. • Use relevant illustrations. • Utilize dialogue. • Apply literary conflict. • Include literary elements (Standard 1.3.5.B.). • Use literary devices (Standard 1.3.5.C.).

A. Write short stories, poems and plays. • Apply varying organizational methods. • Use relevant illustrations. • Utilize dialogue. • Apply literary conflict. • Include literary elements (Standard 1.3.8.B.) . • Use literary devices (Standard 1.3.8.C.).

A. Write short stories, poems and plays. • Apply varying organizational methods. • Use relevant illustrations. • Utilize dialogue. • Apply literary conflict. • Include varying characteristics (e.g., from limerick to epic, from whimsical to dramatic). • Include literary elements (Standard 1.3.11.B.) . • Use literary devices (Standard 1.3.11.C.).

 

B. Write informational pieces (e.g., descriptions, letters, reports, instructions) using illustrations when relevant.

B. Write multi-paragraph informational pieces (e.g., essays, descriptions, letters, reports, instructions). • Include cause and effect. • Develop a problem and solution when appropriate to the topic. • Use relevant graphics (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, tables, illustrations, photographs).

B. Write multi-paragraph informational pieces (e.g., letters, descriptions, reports, instructions, essays, articles, interviews). • Include cause and effect. • Develop a problem and solution when appropriate to the topic. • Use relevant graphics (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, tables, illustrations, photographs). • Use primary and secondary sources.

B. Write complex informational pieces (e.g., research papers, analyses, evaluations, essays). • Include a variety of methods to develop the main idea. • Use precise language and specific detail. • Include cause and effect. • Use relevant graphics (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, tables, illustrations, photographs). • Use primary and secondary sources.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

C. Write an opinion and support it with facts.

C. Write persuasive pieces with a clearly stated position or opinion and supporting detail, citing sources when needed.

C. Write persuasive pieces. • Include a clearly stated position or opinion. • Include convincing, elaborated and properly cited evidence. • Develop reader interest. • Anticipate and counter reader concerns and arguments. D. Maintain a written record of activities, course work, experience, honors and interests.

C. Write persuasive pieces. • Include a clearly stated position or opinion. • Include convincing, elaborated and properly cited evidence. • Develop reader interest. • Anticipate and counter reader concerns and arguments. • Include a variety of methods to advance the argument or position. D. Maintain a written record of activities, course work, experience, honors and interests. E. Write a personal resum-.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.5. Quality of Writing

 

1.5.3. GRADE 3

1.5.5. GRADE 5

1.5.8. GRADE 8

1.5.11. GRADE 11

 

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

 

A. Write with a sharp, distinct focus identifying topic, task and audience. B. Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topic. • Gather and organize information. • Write a series of related sentences or paragraphs with one central idea. • Incorporate details relevant and appropriate to the topic. C. Write with controlled and/or subtle organization. • Sustain a logical order. • Include a recognizable beginning, middle and end.

A. Write with a sharp, distinct focus identifying topic, task and audience. B. Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topic. • Gather, organize and select the most effective information appropriate for the topic, task and audience. • Write paragraphs that have a topic sentence and supporting details. C. Write with controlled and/or subtle organization. • Sustain a logical order within sentences and between paragraphs using meaningful transitions. • Include an identifiable introduction, body and conclusion.

A. Write with a sharp, distinct focus. • Identify topic, task and audience. • Establish a single point of view. B. Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topic. • Gather, determine validity and reliability of and organize information. • Employ the most effective format for purpose and audience. • Write paragraphs that have details and information specific to the topic and relevant to the focus. C. Write with controlled and/or subtle organization. • Sustain a logical order within sentences and between paragraphs using meaningful transitions. • Establish topic and purpose in the introduction. • Reiterate the topic and purpose in the conclusion.

A. Write with a sharp, distinct focus. • Identify topic, task and audience. • Establish and maintain a single point of view. B. Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topic. • Gather, determine validity and reliability of, analyze and organize information. • Employ the most effective format for purpose and audience. • Write fully developed paragraphs that have details and information specific to the topic and relevant to the focus. C. Write with controlled and/or subtle organization. • Sustain a logical order throughout the piece. • Include an effective introduction and conclusion.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

D. Write with an awareness of the

D. Write with an understanding of the

D. Write with an understanding of the

D. Write with a command of the stylistic

 

stylistic aspects of composition.

stylistic aspects of composition.

stylistic aspects of composition.

aspects of composition.

 

• Use sentences of differing lengths

• Use different types and lengths of

• Use different types and lengths of

• Use different types and lengths of

 

and complexities.

sentences.

sentences.

sentences.

 

• Use descriptive words and action

• Use precise language including

• Use tone and voice through the

• Use precise language.

 

verbs.

adjectives, adverbs, action verbs and specific details that convey the writer’s meaning. • Develop and maintain a consistent voice.

use of precise language.

 

 

E. Revise writing to improve detail and

E. Revise writing to improve

E. Revise writing after rethinking logic

E. Revise writing to improve style, word

 

order by identifying missing

organization and word choice; check

of organization and rechecking central

choice, sentence variety and subtlety

 

information and determining whether

the logic, order of ideas and precision

idea, content, paragraph development,

of meaning after rethinking how

 

ideas follow logically.

of vocabulary.

level of detail, style, tone and word choice.

questions of purpose, audience and genre have been addressed.

 

F. Edit writing using the conventions of

F. Edit writing using the conventions of

F. Edit writing using the conventions of

F. Edit writing using the conventions of

 

language. • Spell common, frequently used

language. • Spell common, frequently used

language.• Spell common, frequently used

language.• Spell all words correctly.

 

words correctly.

words correctly.

words correctly.

• Use capital letters correctly.

 

• Use capital letters correctly (first

• Use capital letters correctly.

• Use capital letters correctly.

• Punctuate correctly (periods,

 

word in sentences, proper nouns,

• Punctuate correctly (periods,

• Punctuate correctly (periods,

exclamation points, question

 

pronoun "I").

exclamation points, question

exclamation points, question

marks, commas, quotation marks,

 

• Punctuate correctly (periods,

marks, commas, quotation marks,

marks, commas, quotation marks,

apostrophes, colons, semicolons,

 

exclamation points, question

apostrophes).

apostrophes, colons, semicolons,

parentheses, hyphens, brackets,

 

marks, commas in a series). • Use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs and conjunctions properly.• Use complete sentences (simple, compound, declarative, interrogative, exclamatory and imperative).

• Use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions and interjections properly.• Use complete sentences (simple, compound, declarative, interrogative, exclamatory and imperative).

parentheses).• Use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions and interjections properly.• Use complete sentences (simple, compound, complex, declarative, interrogative, exclamatory and imperative).

ellipses).• Use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions and interjections properly.• Use complete sentences (simple, compound, complex, declarative, interrogative, exclamatory and imperative).

 

G. Present and/or defend written work for

G. Present and/or defend written work for

G. Present and/or defend written work for

G. Present and/or defend written work for

 

publication when appropriate.

publication when appropriate.

publication when appropriate.

publication when appropriate.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.6. Speaking and Listening

 

1.6.3. GRADE 3

1.6.5. GRADE 5

1.6.8. GRADE 8

1.6.11. GRADE 11

 

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

 

A. Listen to others. • Ask questions as an aid to understanding. • Distinguish fact from opinion.

A. Listen to others. • Ask pertinent questions. • Distinguish relevant information, ideas and opinions from those that are irrelevant. • Take notes when prompted.

A. Listen to others. • Ask probing questions. • Analyze information, ideas and opinions to determine relevancy. • Take notes when needed.

A. Listen to others. • Ask clarifying questions. • Synthesize information, ideas and opinions to determine relevancy. • Take notes.

 

B. Listen to a selection of literature (fiction and/or nonfiction). • Relate it to similar experiences. • Predict what will happen next. • Retell a story in chronological order. • Recognize character and tone. • Identify and define new words and concepts.

B. Listen to a selection of literature (fiction and/or nonfiction). • Relate it to what is known. • Predict the result of the story actions. • Retell actions of the story in sequence, explain the theme and describe the characters and setting. • Identify and define new words and concepts. • Summarize the selection.

B. Listen to selections of literature (fiction and/or nonfiction). • Relate them to previous knowledge. • Predict content/events. • Summarize events and identify the significant points. • Identify and define new words and concepts. • Analyze the selections.

B. Listen to selections of literature (fiction and/or nonfiction). • Relate them to previous knowledge. • Predict solutions to identified problems. • Summarize and reflect on what has been heard. • Identify and define new words and concepts. • Analyze and synthesize the selections relating them to other selections heard or read.

 

C. Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations. • Use appropriate volume. • Pronounce most words accurately. • Pace speech so that is understandable.

C. Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations. • Use complete sentences. • Pronounce words correctly. • Use appropriate volume. • Pace speech so that it is understandable.

C. Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations. • Use complete sentences. • Pronounce words correctly. • Adjust volume to purpose and audience.

C. Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations. • Use a variety of sentence structures to add interest to a presentation. • Pace the presentation according to audience and purpose.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

• Demonstrate an awareness of

• Adjust content for different

• Adjust pace to convey meaning.

• Adjust stress, volume and

 

audience.

audiences (e.g., fellow classmates, parents). • Speak with a purpose in mind.

• Add stress (emphasis) and inflection to enhance meaning.

inflection to provide emphasis to ideas or to influence the audience.

 

D. Contribute to discussions.

D. Contribute to discussions.

D. Contribute to discussions.

D. Contribute to discussions.

 

• Ask relevant questions.

• Ask relevant questions.

• Ask relevant, probing questions.

• Ask relevant, clarifying

 

• Respond with appropriate

• Respond with relevant

• Respond with relevant

questions.

 

information or opinions to

information or opinions to

information, ideas or reasons in

• Respond with relevant

 

questions asked.

questions asked.

support of opinions expressed.

information or opinions to

 

• Listen to and acknowledge the

• Listen to and acknowledge the

• Listen to and acknowledge the

questions asked.

 

contributions of others.

contributions of others.

contributions of others.

• Listen to and acknowledge the

 

• Display appropriate turn-taking

• Adjust involvement to encourage

• Adjust tone and involvement to

contributions of others.

 

behaviors.

equitable participation. • Give reasons for opinions. • Summarize, when prompted.

encourage equitable participation. • Clarify, illustrate or expand on a response when asked. • Present support for opinions. • Paraphrase and summarize, when prompted.

• Adjust tone and involvement to encourage equitable participation. • Facilitate total group participation. • Introduce relevant, facilitating information, ideas and opinions to enrich the discussion. • Paraphrase and summarize as needed.

 

E. Participate in small and large group

E. Participate in small and large group

E. Participate in small and large group

E. Participate in small and large group

 

discussions and presentations. • Participate in everyday

discussions and presentations. • Participate in everyday

discussions and presentations. • Initiate everyday conversation.

discussions and presentations. • Initiate everyday conversation.

 

conversation. • Present oral readings. • Deliver short reports (e.g., Show-

conversation. • Present an oral reading. • Deliver research reports.

• Select a topic and present an oral reading. • Conduct interviews as part of the

• Select and present an oral reading on an assigned topic. • Conduct interviews.

 

and-Tell, field trip summary). • Conduct short interviews. • Give simple directions and

• Conduct interviews. • Plan and participate in group presentations.

research process. • Organize and participate in informal debates.

• Participate in a formal interview (e.g., for a job, college). • Organize and participate in

 

explanations. • Report an emergency.

• Contribute to informal debates.

 

informal debate around a specific topic.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

 

 

 

• Use evaluation guides (e.g., National Issues Forum, Toastmasters) to evaluate group discussion (e.g., of peers, on television).

 

F. Use media for learning purposes. • Explain the importance of television, radio, film and Internet in the lives of people. • Explain how advertising sells products. • Show or explain what was learned (e.g., audiotape, computer download).

F. Use media for learning purposes. • Compare information received on television with that received on radio or in newspapers. • Access information on Internet. • Discuss the reliability of information received on Internet sources. • Explain how film can represent either accurate versions or fictional versions of the same event. • Explain the role of advertisers in the media. • Use a variety of images and sounds to create an effective presentation on a topic.

F. Use media for learning purposes. • Describe how the media provides information that is sometimes accurate, sometimes biased based on a point of view or by the opinion or beliefs of the presenter. • Analyze the role of advertising in the media. • Create a multimedia (e.g., film, music, computer-graphic) presentation for display or transmission.

F. Use media for learning purposes. • Use various forms of media to elicit information, to make a student presentation and to complete class assignments and projects. • Evaluate the role of media in focusing attention and forming opinions. • Create a multi-media (e.g., film, music, computer-graphic) presentation for display or transmission that demonstrates an understanding of a specific topic or issue or teaches others about it.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.7. Characteristics and Functions of the English Language

 

1.7.3. GRADE 3

1.7.5. GRADE 5

1.7.8. GRADE 8

1.7.11. GRADE 11

 

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

 

A. Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words. B. Identify variations in the dialogues of literary characters and relate them to differences in occupation or geographical location.

A. Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words. Use a dictionary to find the meanings and origins of these words. B. Identify differences in formal and informal speech (e.g., dialect, slang, jargon). C. Identify word meanings that have changed over time (e.g., cool, mouse).

A. Describe the origins and meanings of common, learned and foreign words used frequently in English language (e.g., carte blanche, faux pas). B. Analyze the role and place of standard American English in speech, writing and literature. C. Identify new words that have been added to the English language over time.

A. Describe the influence of historical events on the English language. B. Analyze when differences in language are a source of negative or positive stereotypes among groups. C. Explain and evaluate the role and influence of the English language within and across countries.

 

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

1.8. Research

1.8.3. GRADE 3

1.8.5. GRADE 5

1.8.8. GRADE 8

1.8.11. GRADE 11

Pennsylvania’s public schools shall teach, challenge and support every student to realize his or her maximum potential and to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to:

A. Select a topic for research.

A. Select and refine a topic for research.

A. Select and refine a topic for research.

A. Select and refine a topic for research.

B. Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies. • Locate resources for a particular task (e.g., newspapers, dictionary). • Select sources (e.g., dictionaries, encyclopedias, interviews to write a family history, observations, electronic media). • Use tables of contents, key words and guide words. • Use traditional and electronic search tools.

B. Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies. • Evaluate the usefulness and qualities of the sources. • Select appropriate sources (e.g., dictionaries, encyclopedias, other reference materials, interviews, observations, computer databases). • Use tables of contents, indices, key words, cross-references and appendices. • Use traditional and electronic search tools.

B. Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies. • Determine valid resources for researching the topic, including primary and secondary sources. • Evaluate the importance and quality of the sources. • Select essential sources (e.g., dictionaries, encyclopedias, other reference materials, interviews, observations, computer databases). • Use tables of contents, indices, key words, cross-references and appendices. • Use traditional and electronic search tools.

B. Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies. • Determine valid resources for researching the topic, including primary and secondary sources. • Evaluate the importance and quality of the sources. • Select sources appropriate to the breadth and depth of the research (e.g., dictionaries, thesauruses, other reference materials, interviews, observations, computer databases). • Use tables of contents, indices, key words, cross-references and appendices. • Use traditional and electronic search tools.

C. Organize and present the main ideas from research. • Take notes from sources using a structured format. • Summarize, orally or in writing, the main ideas.

C. Organize and present the main ideas from research. • Take notes from sources using a structured format. • Present the topic using relevant information.

C. Organize, summarize and present the main ideas from research. • Identify the steps necessary to carry out a research project. • Take relevant notes from sources. • Develop a thesis statement based on research.

C. Organize, summarize and present the main ideas from research. • Take notes relevant to the research topic. • Develop a thesis statement based on research.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

 

• Credit sources using a structured

• Give precise, formal credit for

• Anticipate readers’ problems or

 

format (e.g., author, title).

others’ ideas, images or

misunderstandings.

 

 

information using a standard

• Give precise, formal credit for

 

 

method of documentation. • Use formatting techniques to

others’ ideas, images or information using a standard

 

 

create an understandable

method of documentation.

 

 

presentation for a designated

• Use formatting techniques (e.g.,

 

 

audience.

headings, graphics) to aid reader

 

 

 

understanding.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

III. GLOSSARY

Alliteration:

The repetition of initial consonant sounds in neighboring words.

Allusion:

An implied or indirect reference in literature to a familiar person, place or event.

Analysis:

The process or result of identifying the parts of a whole and their relationships to one another.

Antonym:

A word that is the opposite of another word.

Characterization:

The method an author uses to reveal characters and their various personalities.

Compare:

Place together characters, situations or ideas to show common or differing features in literary selections.

Context clues:

Information from the reading that identifies a word or group of words.

Conventions of

 

language:

Mechanics, usage and sentence completeness.

Evaluate:

Examine and judge carefully.

Figurative

 

language:

Language that cannot be taken literally since it was written to create a special effect or feeling.

Fluency:

The clear, easy, written or spoken expression of ideas. Freedom from word-identification problems which might hinder

 

comprehension in silent reading or the expression of ideas in oral reading.

Focus:

The center of interest or attention.

 

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

Genre: A category used to classify literary works, usually by form, technique or content (e.g., prose, poetry). Graphic organizer: A diagram or pictorial device that shows relationships. Homophone: One of two or more words pronounced alike, but different in spelling or meaning (e.g., hair/hare, scale (fish)/scale

(musical)).

Hyperbole: An exaggeration or overstatement (e.g., I was so embarrassed I could have died.).

Idiomatic language: An expression peculiar to itself grammatically or that cannot be understood if taken literally (e.g., Let’s get on the ball.).

Irony: The use of a word or phrase to mean the exact opposite of its literal or usual meaning; incongruity between the actual result

of a sequence of events and the expected result.

Literary conflict: The struggle that grows out of the interplay of the two opposing forces in a plot.

Literary elements: The essential techniques used in literature (e.g., characterization, setting, plot, theme).

Literary devices: Tools used by the author to enliven and provide voice to the writing (e.g., dialogue, alliteration).

Literary structures: The author’s method of organizing text (e.g., foreshadowing, flashbacks).

Metaphor: The comparison of two unlike things in which no words of comparison (like or as) are used (e.g., That new kid in class is

really a squirrel.).

Meter: The repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry.

Narrative: A story, actual or fictional, expressed orally or in writing.

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

Paraphrase: Restate text or passage in other words, often to clarify meaning or show understanding. Pattern book: A book with a predictable language structure and often written with predictable text; also known as predictable book. Personification: An object or abstract idea given human qualities or human form (e.g., Flowers danced about the lawn.). Phonics: The relationship between letters and sounds fundamental in beginning reading. Point of view: The way in which an author reveals characters, events and ideas in telling a story; the vantage point from which

the story is told.

Public document: A document that focuses on civic issues or matters of public policy at the community level and beyond.

Reading critically: Reading in which a questioning attitude, logical analysis and inference are used to judge the worth of text; evaluating

relevancy and adequacy of what is read; the judgement of validity or worth of what is read, based on sound criteria.

Reading rate: The speed at which a person reads, usually silently.

Research: A systematic inquiry into a subject or problem in order to discover, verify or revise relevant facts or principles

having to do with that subject or problem.

Satire: A literary tone used to ridicule or make fun of human vice or weakness.

Self-monitor: Know when what one is reading or writing is not making sense; adjust strategies for comprehension.

Semantics: The study of meaning in language.

Simile: A comparison of two unlike things in which a word of comparison (like or as) is used (e.g., She eats like a bird.).

Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

Sources:

Primary:

Text and/or artifacts that tell or show a first-hand account of an event; original works used when researching.

Secondary:

Text and/or artifacts used when researching that are derived from something original.

Subject area:

An organized body of knowledge; a discipline; a content area.

Style:

How an author writes; an author’s use of language; its effects and appropriateness to the author’s intent and

 

theme.

Synonym:

One of two or more words in a language that have highly similar meanings (e.g., sorrow, grief, sadness).

Syntax:

The pattern or structure of word order in sentences, clauses and phrases.

Theme:

A topic of discussion or writing; a major idea broad enough to cover the entire scope of a literary work.

Thesis:

The basic argument advanced by a speaker or writer who then attempts to prove it; the subject or major

 

argument of a speech or composition.

Tone:

The attitude of the author toward the audience and characters (e.g., serious or humorous).

Voice:

The fluency, rhythm and liveliness in writing that makes it unique to the writer.